Tour 11: Monterey to Goshen Pass, via Hot Springs
Tour 1: Northern Gateway
Tour 3: Middletown to Winchester
Tour 7: Edinburg to Mt. Jackson, via Singers Glen, New Market Tour 6: Woodstock to Lost City
Tour 2: Charles Town - Shepherdstown via Harpers Ferry
Tour 8: Harrisonburg to Port Republic
Tour 10: Staunton to Steeles Tavern
Tour 12: Lexington and Natural Bridge Tour 4: White Post to Berryville via Millwood
Tour 13: Fincastle to Buchanan
Tour 9: Fort Valley to Page Valley and Luray Tour 5: Strasburg to Front Royal, via Fort Valley
Welcome to the Shenandoah Valley. Although definitions vary, the Shenandoah Valley today is generally considered to run from the West Virginia counties of Berkeley and Jefferson, where the Shenandoah River joins the Potomac River at Harpers Ferry, to points south of Lexington, Virginia.

Located at the Virginia Museum of the Civil War
I-81 Exit 264 in New Market, Va.

511: I-81S at MM 199.8

Description:I-81 at mile 199.8 in Rockbridge County, an incident. The south entrance ramp and exit ramp are closed.The rest area on I-81 southbound at mile marker 199 is closed.Last updated:Wed 10/01/2014 11:51 PM EDT



 


Things to do...

Oct 2--Youth Art exhibition at James Madison University

Oct 2--Theater performance at Blackfriars Playhouse in Staunton, Va.

Oct 2-- Art exhibition in downtown Staunton, Va.

Oct 2-- Art photo exhibition in Martinsburg, W.Va.

Oct 2--Eastern W.Va. Juried Art Exhibit in Martinsburg, W.Va.

Oct 2--Bingo games at the Virginia Horse Center in Lexington, Va.

Oct 2--Deyerle Lecture series program in Harrsionburg, Va.

Oct 2--Civil War history guest lecture series in Winchester, Va.

Oct 2--Convocation lecture at Bridgewater College

Oct 2--Theater performance at Blackfriars Playhouse in Staunton, Va.

Oct 2--Shenandoah Conservatory Main Stage theater series performance at Shenandoah University

Oct 3--Farmers Market in Martinsburg, W.Va.

Oct 3--Civil War history conference in Middleburg, Va.

Oct 3--Corn maze in Berryville, Va.

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Tour 1

Northern Gateway to the Shenandoah Valley: Orchards, Civil War, and an Old Railroad Station


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Tour 2

John Brown’s body, Civil War destruction, a view “worth a voyage across the Atlantic,” and a very early steamboat

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Tour 3

Log, limestone, and brick--a microcosm of early Valley architecture

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Tour 4

Clarke County, “The most English county in the Valley”

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Tour 5

Over the river and through the woods...

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Tour 6

Up and over Great North Mountain (not for the faint of heart)

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Tour 7

Ancient roads, old mills, a musical village, and mountain vistas

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Tour 8

Heart of the Shenandoah Valley

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Tour 9

A hidden valley, scenic drives, a rolling river, a dramatic cavern

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Tour 10

Historic homes, Shakespeare, a folk life museum, and an inventor’s farm

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Tour 11

Maple syrup, sheep, mineral spring baths, and no stop lights

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Tour 12

Jefferson’s stone bridge, an old canal, and two historic colleges

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Tour 12

Southern Gateway to the Shenandoah Valley: A preserved 1800s village, an abandoned canal, and two C&O railroad towns

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Outlook is bright for timely fall foliage display at Shenandoah National Park

 

While national weather forecasters have been predicting the possibility of a cold autumn in the eastern United States, mainly due to another possible polar vortex arriving in early fall, the somewhat different weather patterns of 2014 could actually encourage colorful foliage this year.

Shenandoah National Park spokesperson Karen Beck-Herzog says that the best thing that can happen is a moist growing season … and that's exactly what happened earlier this year.

Now, she says, “We're having nice, cold days.  We're having crisper nights.  And that's going to set us up potentially for some beautiful fall colors.”

Certainly in past years there have been strange and late timing in the natural color show. This year, look for a more typical arrival of fall and fall colors, says Beck-Herzog, most likely during the during the second to third week in October.

Just 75 miles from Washington D.C., Shenandoah National Park forms the eastern border of much of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley, with about 200,000 acres of federally-designated wilderness sheltering both abundant wildlife and a diverse ecosystem. Over 500 miles of wilderness trails lie within the park borders, including a 100-mile stretch of the Appalachian Trail.

The Skyline Drive is a 1930s-era scenic highway that follows the backbone of the Blue Ridge Mountain range for 105 miles. It offers the perfect venue for viewing one spectacular mountain-top vista after another. The two-lane road winds back and forth along the highest elevations with a 35 m.p.h. speed limit and roadside services that include overnight stays at Big Meadows Lodge and Skyland Resort, as well as a fine restaurant, convenience store and gas stations, cabin rental units and various well-maintained campground facilities and picnic areas.

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